CS 6515: Intro to Graduate Algorithms

Instructional Team

Gerandy Brito
Gerandy Brito
Instructor
Eric Vigoda
Eric Vigoda
Creator
Rocko Graziano
Rocko Graziano
Head TA
Jamie McPeek
Jamie McPeek
Head TA
David Harris
David Harris
Head TA
Christian Stober
Christian Stober
Head TA
Emily Lentz
Emily Lentz
Head TA
Aja Woolworth
Aja Woolworth
Head TA
Joves Luo
Joves Luo
Head TA

Overview

This course is a graduate-level course in the design and analysis of algorithms. We study techniques for the design of algorithms (such as dynamic programming) and algorithms for fundamental problems (such as fast Fourier transform FFT). In addition, we study computational intractability, specifically, the theory of NP-completeness. The main topics covered in the course include: dynamic programming; divide and conquer, including FFT; randomized algorithms, including RSA cryptosystem;  graph algorithms; max-flow algorithms; linear programming; and NP-completeness.

Foundational Course Computational Perception & Robotics Core Course Computing Systems Core Course Interactive Intelligence Core Course Machine Learning Core Course

Sample Syllabus

Summer 2024 syllabus (PDF)
Spring 2024 syllabus (PDF)
Summer 2023 syllabus (PDF)

Note: Sample syllabi are provided for informational purposes only. For the most up-to-date information, consult the official course documentation.

Course Content

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Before Taking This Class...

Suggested Background Knowledge

Students are expected to have an undergraduate course on the design and analysis of algorithms. In particular, they should be familiar with basic graph algorithms, including DFS, BFS, and Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm, and basic dynamic programming and divide and conquer algorithms (including solving recurrences). An undergraduate course in discrete mathematics is assumed, and students should be comfortable analyzing the asymptotic running time of algorithms.

CS 8001 OLP is a one credit-hour seminar designed to fulfill prerequisites to succeed in CS 6515. More information is available on the CS 8001 Seminars page.

Academic Integrity

All Georgia Tech students are expected to uphold the Georgia Tech Academic Honor Code. This course may impose additional academic integrity stipulations; consult the official course documentation for more information.